Volume 4 (2015)

The International Journal of Transformative Emotional
Intelligence (TIJTEI), V. 4, 2015.

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Click on links below to access individual articles and related content.

Contents

Editors’ Notes (p. vii)

Letter from Dr. Arthur Linskey (p. viii)

Foreword (p. xi)

Note: Please review the journal’s front matter to see Editors’ Notes, Dr. Linskey’s Letter, and Foreword (open access). Click this link to review the bibliography of related works as of the printing of Volume 4.

  1. The Validation of the Spanish Version of the Emotional Skills Assessment Process (ESAP)

    Rosalia Telíz-Tujeque, Gary Low, Darwin Nelson, Michelle Brown, Rebecca Davis, and Richard Hammett

    The purpose of this study was to determine the construct validity of the Spanish version of the Emotional Skills Assessment Process (ESAP) in a targeted population of agriculture college students in Mexico, a population not previously addressed with this instrument. Participants included 272 agriculture students from four institutions in Mexico and 172 Hispanic American students pursuing similar academic majors. Independent samples t tests were conducted and statistically significant differences were found when controlling for ethnicity.

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  2. The Interwoven Characteristics of Emotional intelligence and Sanford Meisner Actor Training

    Heater L. Corwin

    The development of emotional intelligence (EI) is important for life success and happiness. This article defines and demonstrates links between emotional intelligence (EI) and actor training. Until now, only general associations have been made linking actor training and social abilities. In this quantitative design, pretest and posttest scores on the dependent variable, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), were compared after one semester to see if actor training had any impact on EI ability. The three levels of the independent variable included a Sanford Meisner actor training group, a nonMeisner actor training group, and a special interest actor training group. No significant difference in MSCEIT scores were found in this pilot study based on the training approaches. Reasons for the findings may be that significant EI development may take more than one semester and/or a different, mixed-methods model is needed to conceptualize EI.

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  3. The Influence of Emotional Intelligence on First–Year College Success

    Tracy T. Tolbert and Madeline C. Justice

    A phenomenological study was conducted to explore the lived experiences of college students who had completed their first year with a focus on their emotional intelligence (EI) skills. This study sought to explore the nature of EI with a focus on the interpersonal experiences of college students who did not live with their parents, but who lived on their college campuses or had other living arrangements away from home. A goal of the study was to identify the meanings ascribed by students for their salient experiences during their first year of college. A purposeful nonprobability sampling method was used to recruit study participants. The data collection included demographics and semi-structured interviews of participants’ first-year college experiences. Responses from all data collection forms were transcribed, sorted, analyzed, and coded for analysis. Themes yielded eight general skills and nine EI skills as important for succeeding in the first year of college.

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  4. The Good, The Bad, The Ugly: Bridging the Gap Between Student and Professor Perceptions

    Lacey Chapman

    In 2012 McLennan Community College implemented a new quality enhancement plan (QEP) to improve student persistence and completion based in large part on the transformative model of emotional intelligence (EI) as operationalized through Nelson and Low’s Emotional Skills Assessment Process. The QEP was implemented as the Learning Environment Adaptability Project (LEAP). The purpose of this qualitative study was to better understand the experiences and perspectives of students and faculty in the time since LEAP has been implemented. Though not always identified specifically as EI skills, important themes that emerged from student interviews included instructor communication, commitment ethic, comfort, self-awareness, assertion, self-esteem, time management, and drive strength. Faculty themes that emerged were the need to connect with students, providing structure, empathy, listening and providing positive feedback, prompt responses to email, flexibility, and respect.

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  5. Emotional Intelligence and Person–Centered Change in a Community College Leadership Development Program

    Stevie Carter

    Research stresses the important relationship between emotional intelligence and leadership quality. This study adds to the literature by beginning to fill a gap in what is understood about the ways that leadership qualities can be developed in college students through leadership-training curricula that includes transformative EI.  This sequential explanatory design incorporated a pre- and posttest administration of the ESAP-A/B emotional skills assessments with 30 college students who were participating in a 2-semester, fall-to-spring, leadership-training program. The purposeful sample of 12 students was chosen for interviews because their ESAP scores changed the most between the pretest and posttest ESAP administrations, which were separated by 8 months of experiential leadership development activities. The 5 top experiences reported as integral to meaningful change included workshops, teamwork, cohort, networking, and orientation, through which the themes of self-esteem and confidence, comfort zone, public speaking, and communication on a team were unpacked. Most ESAP skills changed substantially from the pretest to the posttest, and in the expected directions. Important ESAP skills identified were self-esteem, comfort, empathy, and assertion. The ESAP skill that changed the most was decision making (+43%), but this skill was not addressed as important during the interviews. It was concluded that the college leadership-training program had a positive effect on individual students’ growth. Directions for related future research are shared.

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  6. Improving Teacher Professional Development With Appreciative Inquiry and Emotional Intelligence

    Jamie E. DeWitt and Richard D. Hammett

    Creating meaningful and effective professional development (PD) programs for K-12 teachers is an ongoing challenge. The problem is exacerbated when PD models are implemented without fully aligning PD resources and plans with the training needs of teachers and the organization. This study sought to understand the experiences of teachers about the implementation of PD as a means for improving student outcomes. The purpose of the study was to find ways to enhance PD in order to improve student outcomes at the school. The conceptual framework for this study is interwoven through the constructs of student- centered learning, adult learning theory, transformational learning, self-directed learning, and emotional intelligence (EI). A qualitative case study was used in an appreciative inquiry approach that included a document review, written response survey, a positive assessment of EI skills, and focus group interview with 5 teacher participants. The EI data were analyzed using descriptive statistics to create an average EI profile for the group, and qualitative data were analyzed using inductive and comparative techniques. The results indicated that the teachers desired more focused PD that aligns to organizational goals, is collaborative, and includes support from leadership.

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  7. A Principal Leadership Framework for Enhancing Teacher Practice Through Coaching With Emotional Intelligence

    Nathan R. Templeton, Richard Hammett, Gary Low, Melissa Arrambide, and Kent WIllis

    Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) has mandated school principals begin appraising teachers using the new Teacher Evaluation and Support System (T-TESS). Central to this new instrument is the necessity for principals and other appraisers to improve professional practice through the reciprocal interaction, open dialogue, and continuous learning inherent to coaching. While the T-TESS rubric provides a structured process for the TEA’s vision of what coaching should look like, that vision lacks the inclusion of the soft skills we know are needed for effective success coaching and healthy school environments. In this article, we fill the gap by introducing a research-derived coaching framework that combines situational leadership with emotional intelligence for person-centered coaching and learning. Research directions are suggested based on this more robust model for principal coaching. Students, teachers, schools, and communities benefit when education policy is balanced with social–emotional learning.

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  8. Front–Line Leaders’ Interpretations of Emotioinal Intelligence Skills

    Tanya O’Neill

    This interpretative phenomenological (IPA) study was designed to better understand how front–line leaders made meaning of their own emotional intelligence (EI) skills and how they perceived the efficacy of their use of EI skills within their own workgroups in time–sensitive and production driven work environments. Using the IPA, six phenomenological themes emerged from the findings, including (a) EI was interpreted as the conscious knowledge of one’s own and others’ emotions necessary in socialization as well as in professional development; (b) achievement of EI was identified as a continuous learning process based on strategic application experiences; (c) EI was recognized as an essential element of effective management in building relationships, establishing teamwork, and influencing employees’ positive work values; (d) leaders with high EI interact and tailor their actions and responses to their followers; (e) application of EI harmonizes working relationships, facilitates work efficiency, and enhances employees’ level of participation in the decision-making process; and (f) interactions at individual and group levels are opportunities that improve EI. The findings of the study of the sample of 10 participants indicated that EI is a skills–based model requiring learning and relearning traits and behaviors of subordinates to respond appropriately and tailor–make the necessary approach in managing the teams.

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  9. Emotional Intelligence: A Critical Competency for Leadership Development

    Renee J. Tonioni

    This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and leadership style. The sample included 107 administrators, of which 39% were men and 61% were women, from four metropolitan community colleges in the Midwest. Participants were administered two instruments: the Genos Emotional Intelligence Inventory–Full Version and the Leadership Styles Questionnaire. Results indicated a significant positive relationship between emotional intelligence and democratic leadership style. Results also uncovered a negative relationship between emotional intelligence and laissez-faire leadership style. Although there was no significant difference in emotional intelligence or leadership style by gender, a predictive model of contributing factors of emotional intelligence subscales on overall emotional intelligence did reveal a gender–based difference. Findings of this study identified specific emotional intelligence competencies and leadership styles that, if integrated into leadership development programs, would enhance a leader’s overall emotional intelligence.

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  10. Cognitive and Noncognitive Competencies of Selected World Business Changes

    Shamira Malekar and Tatiana Burns

    The concept of emotional intelligence leading to personal and professional success has generated a great deal of excitement among the public, managers, academicians, and business consultants alike. This study highlighted achievements of some world business changers to develop students and young professionals in ways that were personally meaningful, as well as constructive for society. Cognitive and noncognitive competencies are considered which include being a motivator, an opportunistic mindset, acceptance of risk and potential failure, visionary, strategic and rational analyzer, and lastly being trustworthy. A qualitative review of business changers based on these competencies can inspire, motivate, and will be useful for understanding effective leaders. Meaningful goals are offered for future research.

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  11. Interview with Ashis Sen

    Dr. Ashis Sen serves as General Manager (Training & Balanced Scorecard) at Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) and is the Vice Chairman of Forum for Emotional Intelligence Learning (www.ifeil.org). He is the India Coordinator for Society for Organizational Learning (SOL) and one of the first members at Execution Premium Council at Palladium for Balanced Scorecard Implementation. Dr. Sen has conducted workshops and delivered talks on Strategy, Balanced Scorecard, Emotional Intelligence, Vision Building, Competency Assessment, and Leadership in many forums worldwide. Dr. Sen has actively participated in building a Harvard Business School, Case Study: Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Ltd.: Driving Change Through Internal Communication. Several of his articles have been published in international periodicals including Reflections & Systems Thinker, the Balanced Scorecard Report published by Harvard Business Publishing, Human Factor, and Petrotech, amongst others. He is also a contributing author of two articles that have appeared in previous volumes of this journal.

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