Volume 3 (2014)

The International Journal of Transformative Emotional
Intelligence (TIJTEI), V. 3, 2014.

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Contents

Editors’ Notes (p. vii)

Letter from Dr. Arthur Linskey (p. viii)

Foreword (p. xi)

Note: Please review the journal’s front matter to see Editors’ Notes, Dr. Linskey’s Letter, and Foreword (open access).

  1. Emotional Intelligence: A Trans­for­ma­tive Theory

    Darwin Nel­son and Gary Low
    How do peo­ple change them­selves and become more healthy and pro­duc­tive indi­vid­u­als? What are the char­ac­ter­is­tics and spe­cific behav­iors of highly suc­cess­ful peo­ple? What is healthy per­son­al­ity and how do we develop a way of being in the world that is sat­is­fy­ing and healthy? How can you engage and moti­vate another per­son to focus on their strengths and develop them­selves fully? Ques­tions like this were impor­tant to Gary and I as we began to develop a prac­ti­cal and research derived the­ory of healthy personality and pos­i­tive per­sonal change.
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  2. Rooting the Paradigm of Transformational Leadership

    Delia Elena Mateias, Ph.D. in Psy­chol­ogy, Roman­ian Academy
    This arti­cle exam­ines the roots of the trans­for­ma­tional lead­er­ship con­struct as related to the par­a­digm of emo­tional intel­li­gence. In an attempt to delin­eate the emer­gence of the rela­tion­ship between lead­er­ship and emo­tions, a the­o­ret­i­cal frame­work is pre­sented. Infer­ring lead­er­ship dynam­ics from incep­tions to early con­tem­po­rary notions, this arti­cle acknowl­edges the impact of emo­tions within “the trans­for­ma­tion” of lead­er­ship paradigm.
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  3. From Mea­sur­ing to a Struc­tured Devel­op­ment Approach: EI Schools and their Contributions

    Alessandra R. Gon­zaga and Marcelo do Carmo R.
    The devel­op­ment of pro­grams for improv­ing emo­tional skills goes beyond ques­tions regard­ing the selec­tion of an ade­quate EI model. It is nec­es­sary to con­sider the orga­ni­za­tional con­text as input data for defin­ing objec­tives and action plans. This paper presents our expe­ri­ence in Brazil­ian com­pa­nies with the EI learn­ing pro­gram that we have devel­oped and con­tinue to refine. Our EIL pro­gram includes a basic frame­work for con­duct­ing EI coach­ing, train­ing, and devel­op­ment inter­ven­tions through five stages with well-defined goals and objec­tives, includ­ing (a) define, (b) measure, (c) ana­lyze, (d) improve, and ( e) con­trol. We also dis­cuss the ben­e­fits of using EI to review and revise orga­ni­za­tional prac­tices and poli­cies related to the recur­ring chal­lenges found in orga­ni­za­tions. We also pro­vide a guide­line for the inter­ven­tion, assur­ing the align­ment and pro­duc­tion of mean­ing for the program.
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  4. The Influence of Emotional Intelligence Management Curriculum to Improve College Students’ Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Skills to Impact Leader Behavior and Team Effectiveness

    Cindy Reg­is­ter Love
    Emo­tional intel­li­gence com­pe­ten­cies were viewed as crit­i­cal skills employ­ers seek when hir­ing grad­u­ates based on the National Asso­ci­a­tion of Col­leges and Employ­ers (NACE, 2008) sur­vey. More recently, NACE (2012) reported that employ­ers expressed team­work and col­lab­o­ra­tion as crit­i­cal skills for the work envi­ron­ment, thus mak­ing team­work a top skill that employ­ers value. This quasi-experimental research design con­nects the new rec­om­men­da­tions from the Asso­ci­a­tion to Advance Col­le­giate Schools of Busi­ness with a cur­ricu­lum to improve inter­per­sonal and intrap­er­sonal aspects of lead­er­ship by incor­po­rat­ing EI as an inte­gral part of the Man­age­ment Con­cept course in the School of Busi­ness and Eco­nom­ics at North Car­olina Agri­cul­tural and Tech­ni­cal State Uni­ver­sity. Find­ings sug­gest a pos­i­tive sig­nif­i­cant impact on emo­tional intel­li­gence scores and team effec­tive­ness. Impli­ca­tions are that emo­tional intel­li­gence embed­ded in the busi­ness cur­ricu­lum can make a sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ence in indi­vid­u­als’ per­for­mance in a team environment.
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  5. True Grit: How Developing Emotional Intelligence Makes Better Leaders

    Michael D. Williams
    This arti­cle dis­cusses the con­cept of grit and why it is impor­tant for lead­er­ship. Grit is the prod­uct of Emo­tional Intel­li­gence (EI), the abil­ity to iden­tify, assess, and con­trol the emo­tions of one­self and oth­ers in order to accom­plish the mis­sion. Cul­ti­vat­ing EI instills grit and builds con­fi­dent, com­mit­ted, resilient, and goal-oriented lead­ers. Using exam­ples from the Army Spe­cial Forces com­mu­nity and Squadron Offi­cer School, this arti­cle high­lights the crit­i­cal role emo­tions play in lead­er­ship, the his­tory of emo­tions and lead­er­ship, how EI influ­ences lead­er­ship, and finally, describes how the Air Force can develop EI to instill grit and bet­ter leaders.
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  6. Developing Healthy, Constructive Relationships With Self and Others

    Michael Elkins
    Spe­cial note of thanks: Michael Elkins, Ph.D., is a pro­fes­sor of com­mu­ni­ca­tion and takes a unique approach to teach­ing inter­per­sonal com­mu­ni­ca­tion while pay­ing atten­tion to intrap­er­sonal com­mu­ni­ca­tion.  We thank Dr. Elkins for his con­tri­bu­tion of this impor­tant arti­cle, which also appeared as a chap­ter in our book, Teach­ing and Learn­ing Excel­lence (Nel­son, Low, Nel­son, & Ham­mett, 2015), and we appre­ci­ate him for his good work with students.
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  7. Infusing Emotional Intelligence Skills Into College Mathematics Classrooms

    Paula Kenney-Wallace and La Vonne Fedyn­ich
    Mathematic con­tin­ues to receive much atten­tion from uni­ver­sity and col­lege admin­is­tra­tors and edu­ca­tors with respect to stu­dent achieve­ment. As the achieve­ment rates con­tinue to be a major focus area, col­lege fac­ulty and admin­is­tra­tion are research­ing and inves­ti­gat­ing addi­tional ways to improve stu­dent suc­cess, specif­i­cally in devel­op­men­tal math­e­mat­ics. Non-traditional fac­tors such as imple­men­ta­tion of emo­tional intel­li­gence skills and constructive/reflective think­ing exer­cises have showed pos­i­tive links to aca­d­e­mic achieve­ment in gen­eral. Such skills inte­grated into math class­rooms may pro­vide the miss­ing link into address­ing the cur­rent cri­sis of math­e­mat­i­cal decline in the United States.
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  8. The Rela­tion­ship Between MBTI® and LSTI® Per­son­al­ity Types in Senior Man­agers of a For­tune 500 Company

    Darwin Nel­son, Gary Low, and Richard Hammett
    Since the begin­ning schools of psy­chol­ogy have pos­tu­lated the essence of per­son­al­ity. The prob­lem with most def­i­n­i­tions is that per­son­al­ity is fixed from an early age, allow­ing for rel­a­tively few options for pos­i­tive change and growth. The pur­pose of this arti­cle is to pro­vide a new research-derived def­i­n­i­tion of per­son­al­ity that allows for life-long learn­ing, devel­op­ment, and improve­ment. A trans­for­ma­tive the­ory of emo­tional intel­li­gence (EI) pro­vided the the­o­ret­i­cal frame­work for the study to address how a new EI-centric mea­sure of per­son­al­ity, the Life Style Type Indi­ca­tor (LSTI®), is related to the pop­u­lar Myers-Briggs Type Indi­ca­tor (MBTI®). The quan­ti­ta­tive study involv­ing senior cor­po­rate man­agers (N=93) resulted in 13 sig­nif­i­cant cor­re­la­tions between LSTI® and MBTI® mea­sures. These find­ings will be use­ful to any­one who is inter­ested in help­ing peo­ple change and develop in pos­i­tive ways.
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  9. Margo Murray Interview with EITRI

    Margo Mur­ray, MBA, CPT, is Pres­i­dent and Chief Oper­at­ing Offi­cer of MMHA The Man­agers’ Men­tors, Inc., an international consulting firm, founded in 1974. Margo and the MMHA team have inte­grated the emo­tional intel­li­gence research and resources of Drs. Nel­son and Low into per­for­mance improve­ment processes for more than thirty years. She has a unique combination of experience in line and staff man­age­ment, aca­d­e­mic work in busi­ness and behav­ioral sci­ences, and expe­ri­ence in struc­tur­ing and man­ag­ing human per­for­mance sys­tems. Her best seller book, Beyond the Myths and Magic of Men­tor­ing: How to Facilitate an Effec­tive Men­tor­ing Process (2nd ed., 2001, Jossey•Bass/Wiley Pub­lish­ers), is con­sid­ered the sem­i­nal work on facil­i­tated men­tor­ing. The MMHA Facil­i­tated Men­tor­ing Model and Processes© , has been imple­mented in more than 100 orga­ni­za­tions in 25+ countries worldwide.
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